Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

Trinity has been both a part of the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History's  teen program, Subjects to Change (2014-15), and their Community Programs Intern (2015-16). In both of these roles she participated in and led many activities that engaged the community in local and global issues of social justice and environmental sustainability. Below are a few examples of the craft projects that Trinity led during her time at the MAH, which she designed, prepped, and facilitated at a public event in accordance with the the principles of sustainability, community engagement, accessibility, education, and fun.

IMG_1968.jpg

Slow Fashion Patches

This project, which was part of the museum's annual event Radical Craft Night, involved teaching guests of the museum how to mend their belongings and keep textile waste out of the landfill using fun patches made of fabric from down-cycled clothing. Trinity created and displayed informational signs describing the woes of the conventional textile lifecycle, and distributed a zine of her own making titled "The Art of Mending" which she has been distributing ever since. 

IMG_2241.jpg

Funky Food Printing

For this project, Trinity decided to design an interactive activity that was accessible to a younger audience. She designed, prototyped, and led an activity that involved using vegetables as makeshift stamps for creating printed notecards. The project was a success, albeit a very messy one, and guests walked away with colorful greeting cards of their own making.

IMG_2302.JPG

UpCycled Paper Gift Bags

As part of the Winterpalooza, a holiday fest at the museum complete with toy trains and hundreds of paper snowflakes, Trinity decided to offer guests a way to reduce the waste that typically accompanies holiday gift wrapping. By collecting old maps, magazines, wrapping papers, and the like from the museum's infamous basement, and designing a straightforward display board with each step of the project, Trinity educated guests on how to fold their own gift bags out of recycled papers, a skill they can use year after year to combat the holiday waste stream.